Showerheads: Low flow, high style

Personally, I’ll take the water-saver (with drizzle switch) that we got from Greater Goods on 6th & High, but Sunset magazine also has some tips for picking stylish yet decently efficient showerheads.

Link: Low flow, high style.

"When you consider that the shower accounts for up to 30 percent of household water use, this simple switch translates to big savings in water and energy bills. And today’s fixtures are as striking as they are efficient.

All of the fixtures can be swapped in for a wall-mounted showerhead."

6 thoughts on “Showerheads: Low flow, high style”

  1. how is the water pressure on a low flow? My parents got a low flow once, and my mom said the shower with it was horrible. I’m a big fan of highish water pressure, so that’s my big worry.

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  2. It really depends on the brand, I think. Ours – I’ll have to see if I can find the manufacturer – is great. The pressure is amazing, the flow just right. The unit we got also had a drizzle switch built in. That was nice, since we didn’t have to get them separately, and can just pop the switch to save water while lathering up.

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  3. Let us not forget how important showers are. 1995-1996, when I was about 16-17 years old, and a junior in high school, I literally looked and smelled like a homless person. I wouldn’t shave for weeks on end. And in class, when I should have been paying attention, I was scraping the dirt off my arm. (Oh, look! A clean spot!) This is highly ironic, since anyone who knows me well, knows that I have been diagnosed with OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder), and now, I’m somewhat of a clean-freak, but on my own personal terms. Anyway, my point is: remember the story about the person who cried because they had no shoes. And be thankful that we live in an age where we have ample access to such amenities. After all, some of us would be in a padded room somewhere, in the eternal embrace of a straitjacket without them. -M.T.S.

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  4. There are new bath and kitchen low flow aerators that turn on and off with an easy flip of your finger; great when soaping up hands, loading a just rinsed dish into the dishwasher, and soaping up in the shower. A new water conservation products organization called http://www.DoughtBusters.org has them.

    Reply

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